Guitar player. Source: Elena Efimova/Shutterstock.com
Guitar player. Source: Elena Efimova/Shutterstock.com

For all the musicians out there, creating your own customized guitar pick may be a fun way to personalize your gear. But how do you do it?

Designing your own 3D Printed Guitar Pick

See the specifications of our guitar pick in Figure 1 to use for your design and tweak as needed. Create your pick with the text or design that you want using your 3D software of choice. When you’re ready to print, use either a high-end 3D printer such as the Connex500 or upload your design to WhiteClouds. We will 3D print it for you and deliver it to your door. You can also try printing a pick on a home 3D printer, but it may break.

We have interviewed our designer, Jess, for some tips.

What’s your process in designing the guitar pick?

I found specs on Google for the pick I designed. I ran two test runs to get the thickness right. I used SolidWorks to design my pick but I think you could use Blender as well.

Here’s what Justin, our Graphic Designer and also a talented musician, had to say about the 3D printed guitar pick:

Have you used the pick yet? How did it sound?

I broke a few so Jess was going to work out some kinks and incorporate some more rubber into the material. I brought one home, and was playing with it last night actually. It was a fairly thick one and it sounded different than any other pick I had played with before. I'm going to investigate some more and see what I think is causing this different sound. It made the guitar a brighter sound actually…kinda cool.

Justin’s description is a fascinating effect of 3D printed picks. What other kinds of musical sounds and discoveries might be made with 3D printing? We look forward to finding out!

How WhiteClouds 3D Printed a Guitar Pick

We printed the pick with the name of our Graphic Designer, Justin, embedded in it. The thickness of the pick is 0.012”.  See Figure 1 for exact specs. We used the Connex500 3D printer to print the pick using a material called Rigid Opaque, but the pick broke. To fix this issue, Jess used a mixture of Rigid Opaque and Rubber-like material to create a pick that doesn't break.  Jess advised against printing the pick with ABS or PLA plastic as it will not be pliable and strong enough and the pick will likely break when used.

Upload Your Design to WhiteClouds

Ready to 3D print your design but don’t have a 3D printer? Upload your files to a 3D printing service such as WhiteClouds and we will take care of everything for you. Happy playing!